SERVING THE LOS ANGELES METROPOLITAN  AREA, AND BEYOND                           

     13-19 Av, 5780                                                        Aug.3-9, 2020 -- THE JEWISH OBSERVER, LOS ANGELES--640th Web Ed.



                                                                                               

​DRESCHER JOINS SHARSHERET IN FIGHT AGAINST CANCER




















Actor Fran Drescher


By JORDAN ALTMAN

Fran Drescher was special guest speaker in Midsummer Miracles, at Sharsheret’s, a national not-for-profit that supports women and families facing breast or ovarian cancer, streaming fundraiser in partnership with Cancer Schmancer. The premiere recently took place featuring Broadway stars Mandy Gonzalez, Brittney Johnson, Adam Kantor, Valisia LeKae, and Mentalist Oz Pearlman. 

Midsummer Miracles honored Linda Gruenbaum as guest of honor, Linda Zucker receiving the Lisa Altman Volunteer Tribute Award and Michael Albalah receiving the Next Gen Award. This event commemorated the 5th Yahrtzeit of Sharsheret’s dear founder Rochelle Shoretz A”H and was dedicated in memory of Lisa Altman A”H. 

Sharsheret's Executive Director Elana Silber said, “We are proud to partner with Cancer Schmancer and Fran Drescher, a shining example of a woman who has taken her cancer experience to inspire others to live life to the fullest,” 

She added that “Midsummer Miracles will reach a global audience and deeply touch thousands as we showcase the life-changing and life-saving impact of Sharsheret’s work through the voices of Broadway talent and the intimate stories of the women and families of Sharsheret.”


THE DAY THAT ENDED HITLER’S REIGN: JULY 20, 1944 











Stauffenberg (l) with Hitler (c) & Wilhelm Keitel (r) in an aborted

attempt at Rastenburg on 15 July 1944.


​By RABBI MARVIN HIER

As the head of the Simon Wiesenthal Center,  I’ve lead many missions to Holocaust sites, all terribly sad and emotionally draining but educationally meaningful. The exception, I promised myself that I would never return too was Wannsee. That palatial house still sitting on the outskirts of Berlin where on January 20, 1942 fourteen high ranking Nazi officials,six of them with PhDs  from leading German University’s sat down to plan the ‘final solution’, the extermination of all of Europe’s Jews, amongst them members of my family.  There sat not street goons but educated intellectuals who even toasted each other on their great accomplishment. As Heinrich Himmler, one of the most powerful man at that time put it some months later, “I want to talk to you ...on a very grave matter...the extermination of the Jewish race...most of you know what it means when one hundred corpses are lying side by side...to have remained decent fellows...this is a page of glory in our history….”

Although the Nazi surrender to the Allies formally ending World War II took place on May 8th, 1945, for Adolf Hitler it really ended on this day, 76 years ago, on July 20, 1944, the day Colonel Claus Von Staufenberg planted a bomb in the Nazi leaders conference room in the Fuhrerbunker in Berlin. The bomb was pushed away at the last minute by one of the attendees allowing Hitler to escape with only a slight wound.  But, truth be told, that day ended Hitler’s reign.  From then on, reeling from the successful Allied landings in Normandy, Hitler knew his end was near. Never again would he able to trust even his closest aides or feel secure enough to attempt a good nights sleep. Indeed from that day on, Adolf Hitler never again addressed the German people at a public rally anywhere in Germany.  The man who loved the Zeig Heils from the masses would never hear them again.  How ironic it is that Hitler’s most guarded secret was the meeting in Wannsee to exterminate Europe’s Jews.

Although the Nazi surrender to the Allies formally ending World War II took place on May 8th, 1945, for Adolf Hitler it really ended on this day, 76 years ago, on July 20, 1944, the day Colonel Claus Von Staufenberg planted a bomb in the Nazi leaders conference room in the Fuhrerbunker in Berlin. The bomb was pushed away at the last minute by one of the attendees allowing Hitler to escape with only a slight wound.  But, truth be told, that day ended Hitler’s reign.  From then on, reeling from the successful Allied landings in Normandy, Hitler knew his end was near. Never again would he able to trust even his closest aides or feel secure enough to attempt a good nights sleep. Indeed from that day on, Adolf Hitler never again addressed the German people at a public rally anywhere in Germany.  The man who loved the Zeig Heils from the masses would never hear them again.  How ironic it is that Hitler’s most guarded secret was the meeting in Wannsee to exterminate Europe’s Jews.

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NICK CANNON CONTINUES DIALOGUE WITH SWC, VIEWS HITLER 
LETTER & DISCUSSES WORKING TOGETHER

















(l-r) Richard Trank, SWC’s Moriah Films writer/director & executive producer, Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean & global social action director & Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean with Nick Cannon


LOS ANGELES – Simon Wiesenthal Center senior officials continued the dialogue with actor, comedian, rapper and television host Nick Cannon during a visit to the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Museum of Tolerance. Last week, Cannon reached out to SWC associate dean and global social action director Rabbi Abraham Cooper after controversial public comments made about Jews, and, following their meeting, issued an explicit apology to the Jewish community.  

During Monday’s visit, Cannon learned about the work of the Center and Museum of Tolerance and discussed ways to work together and build bridges between the Jewish and Black communities, especially young people.

Cannon, seated left, saw The Hitler Letter, the most important document in the SWC archive. He wrote and signed the report while still in the German army on September 16, 1919. Pre-dating Mein Kampf, it details his vision for the “uncompromising removal of the Jews altogether." It was written before Hitler ever knew Heinrich Himmler, Hermann Goring, Reinhard Heydrich or Adolf Eichmann and 20 years before he launched World War II and the Nazi Holocaust. The Hitler Letter is a historical reminder of the power of words and the consequence of failing to stand up to evil.

Cannon toured the Museum of Tolerance where he saw Witness To Truth, portraits of Holocaust survivors who have shared their stories with millions of Museum visitors, as well as the original Vienna office of famed Nazi Hunter Simon Wiesenthal.  

Cannon also toured the in-house production facility of Moriah Films, the Center’s two-time Academy Award®-winning film division. Simon Wiesenthal Center Academy Award®-winner Richard Trank and Cannon discussed working together on some joint media projects to promote tolerance and understanding between the Jewish and Black communities. 

Moved by his experiences, Cannon generously pledged to donate his first paycheck from The Masked Singer to support the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s ongoing work of fighting anti-Semitism and hate.  


UCLA NAZARIAN CENTER'S CURRENTS PUBLICATION FOCUSES ON 
'BLACKNESS' IN ISRAEL


By JEFF DANIELS

The UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies is announced the release of its second issue of Currents: Briefs on Contemporary Israel, a bi-annual publication series comprised of research-informed essays that explore contemporary issues and trends in Israel. Each essay approaches an issue from a theoretical, comparative, or historical perspective to offer scholarly insights on current developments.

The new issue features a timely and insightful article by Professor Uri Dorchin, “The History, Politics and Social Construction of ‘Blackness’ in Israel.” An anthropologist specializing in cultural interactions, Dorchin analyzes how Blackness in Israel has shaped ties between Jews and Arabs, Mizrahim and Ashkenazim, Ethiopians and other immigrants from Africa. In the article, the author writes:

“As an Israeli anthropologist observing the massive protests that have erupted across the United States in response to the police’s brutal killing of another unarmed African American, George Floyd, I cannot avoid making comparisons to the place I come from. There are many significant differences, but also some similarities. While Israeli society is not racially divided between Blacks and whites in the way that American society has long been, Israelis are certainly not color-blind, and having black skin can also have fatal consequences in Israel. For instance, in June 2019, Solomon Teka, an 18-year-old Israeli Jew of Ethiopian descent, was shot to death by an Israeli policeman, sparking widespread demonstrations and rioting.”

Dorchin was a Visiting Assistant Professor at the UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies and the Israel Institute Visiting Assistant Professor at the Nazarian Center. His edited book Blackness in Israel: Rethinking Racial Boundaries is forthcoming in Routledge (2020).

The Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies is an academic center that promotes a broader and deeper understanding of Israel’s history, politics, society, and culture. The Center is a resource for journalists like yourself looking for comment on breaking news or timely topics related to Israel, including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In addition, we can assist journalists looking for experts on American Jewish politics, contemporary anti-Semitism, and American Jewry’s relationship with Israel.



























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