SERVING THE LOS ANGELES METROPOLITAN AREA

8-14 Adar, 5777                                                     March 7-12, 2017 -- THE JEWISH OBSERVER, LOS ANGELES  --  598th Web Ed.

NEXT EDITION 4-10-17




                    


                                                                    

Type your paragraph here.

UCLA TO HOST JEWISH SALONICA: BETWEEN THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE AND MODERN GREECE















LOS ANGELES – Devin Naar, professor from the University of Washington, will speak on Jewish Salonica: Between the Ottoman Empire and Modern Greece at 12 p.m. on Tuesday, March 14, at UCLA 306 Royce Hall.
 
A Maurice Amado Seminar in Sephardic Studies, the event will examine how the collapse of the Ottoman Empire occurred and discuss the rise of modern Greece impact the largest Sephardic Jewish community in the world.

In Jewish Salonica, Naar draws on newly discovered archival materials in Ladino, Greek, Hebrew, and French to demonstrate how the Jews of Salonica (Thessaloniki), once touted as the "Jerusalem of the Balkans," sought to transform themselves from Ottoman Jews into Hellenic Jews during the early twentieth century. In the process, they reinvigorated their connection to their city and claimed it as own-- even on the eve of the Holocaust. Through the case of Salonica, Naar recovers the experiences of a once dynamic and now lost Jewish community at the crossroads of Europe and the Middle East.

The event is sponsored by the UCLA Alan D. Leve Center for Jewish Studies and cosponsored by the UCLA Department of History, UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures, UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies and UCLA Department of Classics

Pre-registration is required.  To RSVP please email cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu or call (310) 267-5327.


UCLA CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES TO HOST SOUTHERN ITALIAN JEWISH LEGACY


LOS ANGELES – Memory and Continuity of the Southern Italian Jewish Legacy Viterbi Lecture in Mediterranean Jewish Studies led by Fabrizio Lelli (University of Salento, Leece) will get under way at
4 p.m. on Thursday, March 16 at UCLA 314 Royce Hall.
 
At the University of Salento, in the region of Apulia in Southeast Italy, Lelli studies the history of Apulian Jewish culture and its major intellectual achievements in the late Middle Ages. He also concentrates on written and oral testimonies of former Jewish refugees, who at the very end of WWII resided in the United Nations transit camps that were established in the region of Apulia.

In this talk, Lelli will focus on this extraordinary spiritual rebirth of contemporary Judaism, by comparing it with other intellectually significant phases of Apulian Judaism in the past.  The event is sponsored by the UCLA Alan D. Leve Center for Jewish Studies with the support of the UCLA Department of Italian, Italian Cultural Institute of Los Angeles.

Pre-registration is required. To RSVP please email cjsrsvp@humnet.ucla.edu or call (310) 267-5327.


Jewish journal that provides coverage of Los Angeles Jewish news regardless of religious faction or nationality.
JEWISH ADVERTISING? E-mail The Los Angeles Jewish Observer(SM) today directly from your mobile phone, at advertising@jewishobserver-la.com, or use the "Contact Us" Page! The Jewish Observer Los Angeles news.
The Jewish Observer is now viewable from your mobile phones on Androids, iPhones, Window Phones and Blackberries!
Copyright @ 2017, The Jewish Observer, Los Angeles, All Rights Reserved.

The Jewish Observer,

Los Angeles

SCHATTE TO DISCUSS EXPLORING PRE- AND POST-REUNIFICATION JEWISH LIFE IN EAST BERLIN















Katja Schatte


LOS ANGELES -- Katja Schatte, professor at University of Washington, will discuss Exploring Pre- and Post-Reunification Jewish Life in East Berlin at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, March 7, in UCLA Social Sciences Building (SOS), Room 250.

What does it mean to be Jewish and of East German origin in post-Holocaust and post-reunification Germany? Who gets to explore these questions? And how can testimony and oral history make historical debates more inclusive and aware of existing biases?

Historians are conscious of the effects of contemporary issues on our understanding of the past. Yet, they are inclined to perceive questions about the present as secondary pursuits. During her dissertation research, Katja Schatte has learned that these questions are central to understanding Jewish life in the GDR and the effects of persecution, exile, and the Holocaust across generations. In her research, she explores Jewish life in East Berlin between the 1970s and the early 1990s with a particular focus on the experiences and activities of women.

The structure of her talk parallels the path of her research, beginning with the scholarly and community dialogue happening in 2016, then moving on to oral history interviews about Jewish life in the late GDR and early post-reunification years, and finally arriving at the testimonies of Holocaust survivors that she is exploring during her residency at the USC Shoah Foundation.

Schatte will touch on issues such as the relationship between the second and third generations of East German Jews, scholarly and community debates about contemporary and East German Jewish identity, Holocaust memory, and the effects of trauma and exile across generations. In doing so, she hopes to show how oral history and testimony cannot only enrich research and teaching, but also help us navigate the relationship between the present and the past in historical scholarship.

Refreshments will be served.

The event is sponsored by the USC Shoah Foundation.  For more series/event info, email cagr@usc.edu.


HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR TO SPEAK AT LA MUSEUM OF THE HOLOCAUST


LOS ANGELES -- Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust invites the public to hear Iossif Ventura, the last surviving Jewish male child born in Chania and one of the only surviving members of the Jewish community in Crete, as he shares his personal story and the history of the Cretan Greek Jews at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 19 at the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, located at 100 The Grove Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

Ventura is a poet & Holocaust survivor.  He survived the Holocaust as a child in hiding. As a poet in his adult life, his poetry expresses his traumatic experiences in reflective and moving language.

The event is sponsored by the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust.  Please RSVP at michael@lamoth.org